Construction Watch: Encouraging regenerative design and construction in higher ed

Colleges and universities are working to restore the natural environments where their campuses are located so they can reduce their carbon footprints
By: | October 31, 2019
The award-winning Krone Engineered Biosystems Building at Georgia Tech (pictured) features plantings for a temporal forest like those indigenous to the Atlanta area.The award-winning Krone Engineered Biosystems Building at Georgia Tech (pictured) features plantings for a temporal forest like those indigenous to the Atlanta area.

How healthy is it to work and study in our buildings? How much carbon do we contribute to the atmosphere that future graduates will have to live with? Are we doing enough to restore the natural environments where our campuses are located? Higher education institutions have long been at the forefront of environmental stewardship, and now must encourage regenerative design and construction to reduce their carbon footprints. Read more.

In other construction news:

The University of Hartford is planning to build a new $58 million, 62,000-square-foot academic building that will provide a state-of-the-art facility for two of the private college’s most in-demand and growing majors: engineering and nursing. Read more.

Members of the Newport Planning Commission recognized that the community can’t accommodate the number of Oregon State University students, faculty and staff expected in the next year. The influx will inundate the city’s already-impacted housing market, made all the more problematic by a lack of construction so far on student housing. Read more.