The pandemic may have ended but the demand for edtech is growing

"The availability of high-speed internet, increasing usage of personal computing devices, and governments' initiatives towards digital learning are the key factors for driving the popularity of online learning platforms," according to a 2021 report from Fortune Business Insights.

One of the greatest challenges higher education has ever had to face was the pandemic. Colleges didn’t choose but were forced to overcome barriers to instruction through innovative educational technology solutions with little to no turnaround as students returned home for remote learning.

However, the dramatic shift in instruction also created a demand for certain services that had gone unnoticed for years.

220 million students were directly affected globally by the pandemic in April of 2020, according to the Boston College Center for International Higher report. Yet, throughout the year as colleges provided remoted instruction, the unprecedented reliance on technology caused a significant surge in the education technology market.

According to an August 2021 report from Fortune Business Insights, the market size grew by 9.9% to nearly $78 billion in 2020. By 2028, that number will more than double and is projected to reach $169 billion by 2028 as the demand and reliance on education technology increases.

“Online learning has started to gain much pace in the higher education sector,” the report reads. “The availability of high-speed internet, increasing usage of personal computing devices, and governments’ initiatives toward digital learning are the key factors for driving the popularity of online learning platforms.”


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This projected growth lines up with student perceptions of online learning as per a 2021 report from Sykes Enterprises as the majority of students highly favored remote instruction. According to the report, 95% of students felt their professors were addressing their personal needs while allowing for understanding in submitting coursework on time. Additionally, 85% of them felt as if they were part of a “classroom community,” and 84% said remote learning was effective.

“The rippling effects from COVID-19 have dramatically transformed higher education systems for good—and with students indicating that virtual learning can offer an effective learning environment, now is the time to further invest in elevating the virtual student learning experience,” Steve Davis, Higher Education Business Development Executive at Sykes, told University Business.

Micah Ward
Micah Wardhttp://universitybusiness.com
Micah Ward is a University Business staff writer. He recently earned his master’s degree in Journalism at the University of Alabama. He spent his time during graduate school working on his master’s thesis. He’s also a self-taught guitarist who loves playing folk-style music.

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