IT

Office on the go

From facilities to IT to public safety, departments are equipping employees with mobile devices to work from anywhere on campus

Members of the facilities crew at Quinnipiac University were spending a lot of time traveling back to their shop during the workday.

This situation, of course, was not unique to Quinnipiac, but department officials at the school set out to eliminate the trips workers had to make to retrieve new work orders, find information about equipment in manuals or look up floor plans. The central Connecticut institution has a 212-acre main campus, and two branches that are a half-mile and about five miles away.

The changing role of the higher ed CIO

Gone are the days when university CIOs filled their time with trouble-shooting computer bugs and managing servers. While today’s university IT staff are still technical experts, they are now expected to be much more than on-campus tech support. Now, more than ever, they are expected to introduce and lead change at the university level.

The changing role of the higher ed CIO

Gone are the days when university CIOs filled their time with trouble-shooting computer bugs and managing servers. “CIOs are at the center of a campus conversation about the proper relationship between technology and education,” says Kamalika Sandell. Associate CIO at American University (AU) in Washington, D.C., Sandell is an expert on IT leadership and speaker at UBTech 2014. “We are now more than ever expected to introduce and lead change at the university level.”

Google Apps vs. Microsoft Office 365

Google and Microsoft are battling for the allegiance of college IT departments. To help attendees decide which email and storage solution might be best for them, UBTech brought in representatives from two universities in June 2013 to compare their installation experiences.

Request Tracker creates organization out of help-desk chaos

It was clear four years ago that Wisconsin-based Carthage College needed a new system for managing help requests from the campus community. The Library and Information Services (LIS) staff of 25 was manually handling nearly 12,000 questions each year from faculty, staff and students about everything library or technology-related. Additionally, many of the requests were sent made informally directly to technicians. That made tracking and follow-up nearly impossible, especially given the rapid growth the college was experiencing.

Request Tracker creates organization out of help-desk chaos

Carthage College needed a new system for managing help requests from the campus community and installed two solutions: Request Tracker and a self-service password changer system. By the end of the fiscal year, in August 2014, the number of annual help desk requests is projected to be 5,000-6,000—down to half what it was before the installation of Request Tracker.

Carthage College is centralizing help requests

The Library and Information Services department at Carthage College in Wisconsin answers nearly 10,000 questions a year, ranging from where to find a book to figuring out why a student’s email account suddenly stopped working or helping a faculty member put a course online. With requests on the rise, a tracking process was needed to keep employees and community members informed.

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