Colleges tinker with fall 2020 tuition to aid students

At Davidson College, most students can defer tuition payments until August 2021
By: | April 22, 2020
Tution adjustments for fall 2020 include Southern New Hampshire University's full scholarship for first-year students. (Peter Dazeley/GettyImages.com)Tution adjustments for fall 2020 include Southern New Hampshire University's full scholarship for first-year students. (Peter Dazeley/GettyImages.com)

Davidson College, Southern New Hampshire University and other institutions are loosening tuition requirements to help students weather the coronavirus economic crisis.

At Davidson College in North Carolina, all undergraduate students—except seniors—can defer fall tuition payments until August 2021. Seniors can defer until April, 2021.

“Our primary purpose is the development of humane instincts, discipline and creativity as key to preparing students for lives of leadership and service,” Alison Hall Mauzé, chair of Davidson’s board of trustees, said in a university release. “This adaptation to their urgent needs reflects that purpose and helps us send more of them into the world at a time when we need these smart, driven and kind people.”

Southern New Hampshire University is offering full-tuition scholarships for incoming first-year students, the school announced Wednesday.


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These students will take their courses online while living on campus so they can participate in clubs, athletics and other activities. In 2021, these students will be eligible for university’s newly reduced $10,000 per year tuition rate.

“We know that we will need innovative ideas to overcome the challenges ahead,” President and CEO Paul LeBlanc said in a statement. “The status quo in higher education is not going to help get our economy going again.”

Syracuse University has offered its class of 2020 half-off tuition at its graduate schools, Syracuse.com reported.

The program is called the “2020 Forever Orange Scholarship.”


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“You and your classmates have adjusted to online learning and missed out on much-anticipated activities ahead of receiving your degree,” Interim Vice Chancellor and Provost Zhanjiang Liu and Dean of the Graduate School Peter Vanable wrote in an e-mail to students, according to Syracuse.com.

“You will be facing a job market that may be much different than you anticipated, prompting more thought about graduate studies. We have a new opportunity to support your continued education at Syracuse University,” they wrote.