Updated: 5 ways higher ed is helping students afford their tuition

An overwhelming number of students believe they cannot finance their undergraduate degree, study shows
By: | June 29, 2020
Due to complications as a result of the coronavirus, more students need help with tuition payments, so higher ed leaders are stepping up by providing tuition scholarships, free tuition for online courses and creating other tuition program initiatives.Image provided by University of Houston-Downtown in Texas.

Colleges and universities are increasingly under pressure to help students pay for their education as complications related to the coronavirus continue to create financial burdens for families.

Nearly 80% of students feel less confident in their ability to finance their education as a result of the coronavirus, according to a survey by Kaleidoscope, an ed tech company that focuses on student loans. More than 900 students were interviewed in the nationwide study, which also found that over 30% of students are concerned about basic housing needs.

Even though higher ed is experiencing its own financial strains, schools have found innovative ways to provide tuition assistance to students so they can continue their education. Here are five strategies that different colleges and universities have adopted to help with tuition. Read the fifth and latest strategy.


Related: How to provide students (and families) with the confidence to enroll now

Related: Future of higher ed: Cutting costs alone isn’t the answer for sustainability

Related: Discounted tuition: One way to help students (and colleges)


1. Retaking courses at no cost

2. Providing free tuition for multiple semesters

3. Awarding tuition scholarships

4. Offering tuition assistance through emergency funds

5. Creating tuition freezes and simplified rate structures

#1 Retaking Courses

Jump to #5 Tuition Freezes and Simplifying Structures

 

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