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It's fitting that the central campus of CPCC, located seconds from downtown Charlotte, N.C., has an inviting front door.

Think "workplace diversity," and people of various races and ethnicities likely come to mind. But those with disabilities are a group not to be forgotten.

The U.S. House higher education subcommittee wants to create a federal college affordability index. The proposal has little to do with ranking colleges in a public image-building contest. It has everything to do with de facto price controls.

Some people wear T-shirts and sweatshirts emblazoned with their alma mater's name. Others display bumper stickers on their cars. The younger set may even stick athletic shorts on their bumpers, proudly bearing a school's logo for all the world (walking behind them) to see.

Fifty-year-old Melissa Grill is a prime example of today's distance learner. While working in the computer lab of a North Carolina community college, she earned a master's degree in information and telecommunications systems management from Capitol College, based in Laurel, Md.

Advancement directors are a lot like gamblers. They can easily recall the vivid details of their "wins"--even years after the fact.

Sometime this fall, Congress might renew the Higher Education Act (HEA). Then again, it might not.

Most discussions on the rise of for-profit colleges begin and end with an arbitrary moral judgment that there's something inherently wrong with for-profit colleges, or an unfounded assertion that these institutions offer inferior academic programs.

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